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 Post subject: How technology can help us become more sustainable
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2016 9:49 am 
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We want to create technology that helps millions of others understand our changing world and live more sustainablywhether its connecting people with public transit routes, or using the data that powers Google Earth to help you see if your roof is good for solar panels. In celebrate of Earth Day this month, weve gathered together some of the ways Google can help you reduce your everyday emissions and learn more about preserving our world.

Monitoring forests and wildlife
Google Earth satellite technology gives scientists and environmentalists a way to measure and visualize changes of the world on both land and water. This technology can have great impact on monitoring endangered animal populations around the world. For example, with the help of Global Forest Watch, powered by Google Earth Engine, scientists at the University of Minnesota are suggesting that wild tiger populations may rebound by 2022, due to the efforts to restore tiger habitats in key regions.

Anyone can now belief tiger thrift areas (in orange and yellow above) using Global Forest Notice

Going solar
Looking to generate clean energy savings with solar power on your home? Check out Project Sunroof, a solar calculator that estimates the impact and potential savings of installing solar on the roof of your home. Taking Google Earth imagery and overlaying annual sun exposure and weather patterns, Sunroof is capable to assess viable roof space for solar panel installation, predict the value of solar and savings based on local energy costs, and connect you with providers of solar panels in your area.

As of this week, Sunroof expanded to 42 states across the U.S. (from 10 states in December), which makes imagery and data available for a solar analysis to 43 million rooftops. Were also working with organizations like Sierra Club and their Ready for 100 campaign to help analyze the solar potential of cities across the US.


Project Sunroof shows you the solar potential of your home and city, allowing you to accomplish its renewable potential. The image on the right shows how much sunshine Denver, CO residents can capture with solar.
Measuring air pollutants
For the past few years, Google Earth Outreach and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) have been working together to map methane leaks from casual gas pipelines under our streets. Since methane is a very potent greenhouse gas (GHG), even small leaks can augment up to big emissions that can hurt our climate. By attaching methane analyzers to select Street Belief cars, weve driven more than 7,500 miles and have mapped 4,200+ leaks in 10 cities. What we found ranges from an average of one leak per mile (in Boston) to one leak every 200 miles (in Indianapolis), demonstrating the effectiveness of techniques like using plastic piping instead of steel for pipeline construction. We hope utilities can use this data to prioritize the replacement of gas mains and service lines (like New Jerseys PSE&G announced last fall). Were also partnering with Aclima to measure many more pollutants with Street Belief cars in California communities through this year.


Anyone can explore the maps at www.edf.org/methanemaps

Technology is crucial to increasing energy efficiency, raising climate change awareness, and sustainability efforts. To learn more about what you can do to help, take a moment to explore our Google Earth Outreach site, where these tools and more are described in depth.

Posted by Rebecca Moore, Engineering Director, Google Earth, Earth Engine & Outreach




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 Post subject: Bring the worlds changing forests inside the classroom
PostPosted: Thu May 26, 2016 12:17 pm 
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Forests are the mighty lungs of our planet. They absorb carbon dioxide, and emit oxygen on which all people and animals on Earth rely. For the sake of our future, it is critical that all people, including the next generation, understand our global forests in order to manage them sustainably. Today, Science in the Classroom, Dr. Matt Hansen of the University of Maryland, and Google Earth Engine are presenting Global Forest Change Explorer to help engage young people in forest thrift.


The Global Forest Change Explorer website contains maps that are available for interactive analysis as well as an accompanying activity worksheet. The Explorer Tool allows students to quickly visualize trends in forest loss and gain, compare different countries and ecoregions, and apply the forest data to try to predict underlying causes where there is distinctive change in forest density. The Explorer Tool relies on open data that is used by remote sensing and GIS professionals in their labor.

Fly to different parts of the world and compare data.

A number of years ago, Dr. Matt Hansen and a team of researchers at the University of Maryland turned to Google Earth Engine to map high-resolution global forest cover with Earth Engines cloud-based image processing and computing. The team mapped global forest loss and gain from 2000 to 2012 at 30-meter resolution for the entire globe. In 2013, the methods and results were published in Science Magazine and online for everyone to explore. These findings are now an distinctive part of the website Global Forest Watch, which gives governments and decision makers free access to the data and tools required to monitor and manage their forests.

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Dr. Matt Hansen presenting at the World Economic Forum

Science in the Classroom (SitC) thought this was great research to bring into the classroom and make available to anyone online. SitC packages annotated research papers with supplemental teaching materials to help pre-college and college students understand the structure and workings of scientific research. SitC and Google Earth Engine built the Global Forest Change Explorer to make Dr. Hansens data accessible to a younger audience.

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We live in a dynamic world where the pressures of population growth increasingly impact and threaten our forests. However, as technology, open data, and people continue to mobilize, we are given more tools to research the health of our planet. Educators can easily flip their classrooms into science labs by combining SitC materials with Global Forest Change Explorer. With these tools, students will leave sessions with richer understanding of environmental change, more curiosity, and a desire to actively participate in protecting our forests.

Get started with Global Forest Change Explorer today!


Posted by Emily Henderson, Google Geo Education Outreach




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 Post subject: Keeping Earth up to date and looking great
PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2016 6:18 pm 
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Three years ago we introduced a cloud-free mosaic of the world in Google Earth. Today were rolling out an even more beautiful and seamless version, with fresh imagery from Landsat 8 satellite and new processing techniques for sharper images than ever before. Satellite images are often cloudy, but not always over the same place, so we looked at millions of images and took the clearest pixels to stitch together this cloud-free and seamless image.
Columbia Glacier, Alaska
Detroit, Michigan
Swiss Alps, Switzerland
Higher Quality Imagery
Landsat 8, which launched into orbit in 2013, is the newest sensor in the USGS/NASA Landsat Programsuperior to its predecessors in many ways. Landsat 8 captures images with greater detail, truer colors, and at an unprecedented frequencycapturing twice as many images as Landsat 7 does every day. This new rendition of Earth uses the most recent data available -- mostly from Landsat 8 -- making it our freshest global mosaic to date.


In the new belief of New York City, details like skyscrapers, building shadows, and baseball and softball fields in Central Park shine through.


Our previous mosaic used imagery from Landsat 7 only, which at the time was the best imagery of its kind. Unfortunately, Landsat 7 images captured after 2003 were affected by a hardware failure, resulting in large diagonal gaps of missing data You can see this effect in the subsets of two Landsat 7 images captured over Oklahoma City, OK, in 2000 and 2003.

July 9, 2000

September 20, 2003
Processing imagery with Earth Engine
To produce this new imagery, we used the same publicly available Earth Engine APIs that scientists use to do things like track global tree cover, loss, and gain; predict Malaria outbreaks; and map global surface water over a 30 year period.


Like our previous mosaic, we mined data from nearly a petabyte of Landsat imagerythats more than 700 trillion individual pixelsto choose the best cloud-free pixels. To put that in perspective, 700 trillion pixels is 7,000 times more pixels than the estimated number of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, or 70 times more pixels than the estimated number of galaxies in the Universe.
Lake Balkhash, Kazakhstan


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Brasilia, Brazil
Open data is good for everyone
This update was made possible in a large part thanks to the Landsat program and its commitment to free and accessible open data. Landsat, a joint program of the USGS and NASA, has observed the Earth continuously from 1972 to the present day and offers a wealth of information on the changes to the Earths surface over time. And its all available in Earth Engine!

The new imagery is now available across all our mapping products. To check it out, open up Google Earth, or turn on the satellite layer in Google Maps.

Post authored by: Chris Herwig, Program Manager, Google Earth Engine




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 Post subject: Walk the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine like the pros with Street Vi
PostPosted: Fri Sep 30, 2016 10:20 pm 
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Walk the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine like the pros with Street Dogma

Earlier this year, Turner Sports approached us with an idea: Help us change the way golf fans experience the sports biggest event of the year, the Ryder Cup. Always up for helping users go where theyve never gone before, we loaned Turner a Street View Trekker. They hit the links to collect hole-by-hole imagery at Minnesotas Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of this years tournament starting today through October 2.

Over two days, the team covered the 160-acres course.

Randy Dickerson, of Turner Sports, gets ready for his first trek. Randy and team carried the 40lb camera over the 5+ mile golf course at Hazeltine National Golf Club.

Not to be outdone by past Street Dogma collects captured by snowmobileboat and zipline, the Trekker hitched a ride on a golf cart.

Explore the images on Google Maps, or walk the course like the pros using the Hazeltine Explorer, an interactive tour developed by Turner and Ubilabs. Along with 360-degree views, the site, built with Google Maps APIs, features custom elevation graphs for every hole, integrated video highlights and course-obvious historical moments.

Fans attending the event can also make use of the Ryder Cup apps Wayfinding feature, available on Android and iOS. Built using Google Maps APIs, the feature includes a detailed dogma of the course with routing instructions that account for walking paths and crosswalks. The map also displays information about on-course amenities and facilities.
iPhone_wayfinder.png

Posted By: Vanessa Schneider, Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach




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 Post subject: Our most detailed view of Earth across space and time
PostPosted: Fri Dec 02, 2016 8:36 am 
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In 2013, we released Google Earth Timelapse, our most comprehensive picture of the Earths changing surface. This interactive experience enabled people to explore these changes like never beforeto notice the sprouting of Dubais artificial Palm Islands, the retreat of Alaskas Columbia Glacier, and the impressive urban expansion of Las Vegas, Nevada. Today, were making our largest update to Timelapse yet, with four additional years of imagery, petabytes of new data, and a sharper belief of the Earth from 1984 to 2016. Weve even teamed up again with our friends at TIME to give you an updated take on compelling locations.










Miruuixiang







Meandering river in Nyingchi, Tibet, China [view in Timelapse] (Image credit: Landsat / Copernicus*)






Leveraging the same techniques we used to improve Google Maps and Google Earth back in June, the new Timelapse reveals a sharper belief of our planet, with truer colors and fewer distracting artifacts. A great example of this is San Francisco and Oakland in California:










Bay Bridge







San Francisco - Oakland Bay Bridge reconstruction [view in Timelapse] (Image credit: Landsat / Copernicus*)





Theres much more to see, including glacial movement in Antarctica, urban growth, forest gain and loss, and infrastructure development:



Using Google Earth Engine, we sifted through about three quadrillion pixelsthats 3 followed by 15 zeroesfrom more than 5,000,000 satellite images. For this latest update, we had access to more images from the past, thanks to the Landsat Global Archive Consolidation Program, and fresh images from two new satellites, Landsat 8 and Sentinel-2.

We took the best of all those pixels to create 33 images of the entire planet, one for each year. We then encoded these new 3.95 terapixel global images into just over 25,000,000 overlapping multi-resolution video tiles, made interactively explorable by Carnegie Mellon CREATE Labs Time Machine library, a technology for creating and viewing zoomable and pannable timelapses over space and time.










Ft. McMurray







Alberta Tar Sands, Canada [View in Timelapse] (Image credit: Landsat / Copernicus*)






To belief the new Timelapse, head over to the Earth Engine website. You can also belief the new annual mosaics in Google Earths historical imagery feature on desktop, or spend a mesmerizing 40 minutes watching this YouTube playlist. Happy exploring!

*Landsat imagery courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and U.S. Geological Survey. Images also contain modified Copernicus Sentinel data 2015- 2016.





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 Post subject: Using machine learning to help people make smart decisions a
PostPosted: Wed Jun 14, 2017 4:42 pm 
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Using machine learning to help people make smart decisions about solar energy

A few years ago, when my family was first deciding whether or not to go solar, I remember driving around the neighborhood, looking at all the solar arrays on nearby rooftops. It made me accomplish: Wow, solar isnt some futuristic concept, its already part of the fabric of my town! Seeing that others around me were already benefiting from solar helped me decide to do the same.

We want to make it easy for people to make informed decisions about whether to invest in solar. Project Sunroof already shows you solar potential and cost saving for more than 60 million individual homes. Today were adding a new feature, Project Sunroof Data Explorer, which shows a map of existing solar installations in neighborhoods throughout the United States. Now instead of driving street to street, its a little easier to see if houses around you and communities nearby have already gone solar.















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Click on existing arrays in the upper right corner to see number of existing installations in your region





This feature combines machine learning with imagery from Google Maps and Google Earth to provide an predict of how many houses in an area have solar. We started by taking in high-resolution imagery of rooftops and manually identifying solar installations. We then used that data as the initial training set for our algorithm. After many iterations, our machine learning algorithms can now automatically find and identify installations in the imagery (both photovoltaic panels, which produce electricity, and solar hot water heaters). Even for machines, practice makes perfect!
















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So far weve identified around 700,000 installations in the U.S. and over time, as we continue to train the algorithms and apply improvements, we will be capable to find and show more installations. We hope that this new feature will provide policy makers, communities and individuals with more information to help make smarter decisions in their transition to cleaner power sources.





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 Post subject: I Am Amazon: Discover your connection to the rainforest with
PostPosted: Wed Jul 12, 2017 11:42 pm 
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I Am Amazon: Discover your connection to the rainforest with Google Earth

For many people around the world, the Amazon is a mysterious faraway land of impenetrable jungles, majestic rivers and indigenous peoples. But what many of us may not accomplish is that we all have a connection to the Amazonthrough the air we breathe, the water that irrigates the food we eat, the casual ingredients in the medicines we use, or the shifting weather patterns that we experience around the globe.

Today we invite you to venture into the heart of the Amazon and discover your connection to the worlds largest rainforest through Voyager, Google Earths storytelling platform. Youll find 11 new interactive stories about different parts of the vast Brazilian Amazon region, which is home to about 27 million people and a wide array of cultures.

All of these stories are told by the diverse peoples who call the forest home, and some were produced by one of Brazils greatest storytellers, the acclaimed film director Fernando Meirelles. Combined, they create an immersive web and mobile experience told through video, mapping, audio and 360° virtual reality, covering a broad anger of issues facing the future of the rainforestand, consequently, the planet.



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These stories imitate the labyrinth of the Amazon, which produces 20 percent of the Earths oxygen and is home to one in 10 of the worlds animal species. Learn about the supply chain behind the vast array of forest delicacies, like Brazil nuts and aaí, that end up on supermarket shelves worldwide; or about local economies once dependent on illegal logging that are now reorganized around sustainability efforts; or about Quilombolas, communities of descendants of enslaved peoples, and their struggle to obtain titles for their lands.
















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Belief "I Am Amazon" in Google Earth





Thanks to our partnership with the Instituto Socioambiental, were also publishing in Google Earth Voyager for the first time a comprehensive atlas of indigenous lands in Brazil and the people who live there. And were filling in those maps with in-depth interactive stories told by the Amazon communities themselves.

You can learn about indigenous peoples like the Tembé and the Paiter Suruí, who are using monitoring technologies to protect their territories from illegal incursions by outsiders and deforestation; or the Yawanawá, a tribe that under the leadership of women has revived its cultural heritage and carved out a place in the global cosmetics industry by sustainably harvesting urucum, a reddish seed used in lipstick and other products.



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These stories are the culmination of 10 years of labor with the peoples of the Amazon. Back in 2007, Paiter Suruí leader Chief Almir came across Google Earth and quickly saw its potential to help safeguard the heritage and traditions of his people. So he proposed a partnership with Google that resulted in an online map of Suruí cultural heritage, the first ever indigenous community-led deforestation and forest carbon mapping project. Through this project, the Suruí calculated the value of their forest on the voluntary carbon marketplace, and became the first indigenous community to receive funds for preserving their lands.




Technology is an distinctive tool that is helping us to protect the forest and detain our traditions alive.



Ubiratan Suruí


Suruí Indigenous People's Association








Over the years, weve built on this labor with the Suruí and expanded it to an additional 30 communities in the Amazon, with more to come. We also recently integrated certified Brazilian indigenous territories into Google Maps, all 472 of them.

Since its creation more than a decade ago, Google Earth has always aimed to bring the magic of our planet to everyone in a beautiful, accessible and enriching way. We hope these fascinating stories from the Amazon do all of that and more, inspiring curious minds to explore, learn and care about our vast, fragile planet.





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 Post subject: Live from the North Pole: whats new at Santas Village
PostPosted: Sat Jan 30, 2021 9:19 am 
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Its the 15th year of Santas Village, an interactive holiday hub where you can play games to learn coding skills, create original artwork, exercise your geographic chops, and more. Heres whats new this year:

Entertain yours-elf with a new game

With our Elf Maker, you can customize an elf from head to toe to make sure theyre stylin for all of the holiday shindigs happening on the North Pole this year. Choose an outfit, accessories, hairstyle, and even facial hair to augment some flair to your little friend.


build and elf

Giving you a better way to follow Santa

One of the hardest parts about being married to Santa is that he always forgets to let me know where he is. This year, Ive enlisted our elite team of cartographelves to let everyone know where he is as soon as he takes off from the North Pole. In the days paramount up to Christmas, Santa will share his location with you on Google Maps so you can see his travels as he moves across the map. Follow along with him there or on our Santa Tracker dashboard on December 24 so you dont miss his visit.


location sharing santa

Going global for the holiday season

From beaches to blizzards, you can get a better glimpse into how people all over the world are spending the holidays. Youll see holiday photos from Local Guides and you can test your knowledge of holiday traditions with a festive quiz powered by Google Earth and Street Belief. Curious about how to say Seasons Greetings or Happy New Year in other languages? Check out our Translations game to take your snowmenclature to new heights.


translations game

These and other educational games, lesson plans, PDFs and instructional videos can be found in Santas Villagestarting this week. If you want more holiday fun, make sure to tell the Google Assistant to tell you a holiday story or starting December 23, ask, Hey Google, wheres Santa?. And make sure to detain things festive with new Gboard holiday stickers found on iOS and Android, and in the Santa Tracker Android App.

From the Claus family to yours, have a very happy holiday. And remember: youre sleighing it.





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 Post subject: Making search results more local and relevant
PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2021 9:52 am 
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When youre searching on Google, we extent to provide the most useful results for your query. Today, around one in five searches on Google is related to location, so providing locally relevant search results is an cultured part of serving you the most accurate information.


In order to provide this optimal experience, your location determines the country service you receive results for across Google Search and Maps. Historically, these services have been labeled and accessed via country code top level domain names (ccTLD) such as [google.ng for Nigeria] or [google.com.br for Brazil]. You may also have typed in the relevant ccTLD in your browser.


Today, weve updated the way we arrange country services on the mobile web, the Google app for iOS, and desktop Search and Maps. Now the choice of country service will no longer be indicated by domain. Instead, by default, youll be served the country service that corresponds to your location. So if you live in Australia, youll automatically receive the country service for Australia, but when you travel to New Zealand, your results will switch automatically to the country service for New Zealand. Upon return to Australia, you will seamlessly revert back to the Australian country service.














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If for some excuse you dont see the right country when youre browsing, you can still go into settings and select the correct country service you want to receive. Typing the relevant ccTLD in your browser will no longer bring you to the various country servicesthis preference should be managed directly in settings. In addition, at the bottom of the search results page, you can clearly see which country service you are currently using.














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Its distinctive to note that while this update will change the way Google Search and Maps services are labeled, it wont affect the way these products labor, nor will it change how we handle obligations under national law. This update will help ensure that you get the most relevant results based on your location and is consistent with how Google already manages our services across a number of our other platforms, including YouTube, Blogger, Google Earth and Gmail, among others.


Were trustful this change will improve your Search experience, automatically providing you with the most useful information based on your search query and other context, including location.




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 Post subject: Google for Nonprofits: 2018 in Review
PostPosted: Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:20 pm 
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This year, more than 100,000 nonprofits around the world connected with their communities and broadcast awareness about their causes using Google products. As 2018 comes to an end, were taking a look back at the many ways these organizations used technology to make a difference.

donorschoose

DonorsChoose.org allows teachers to create projects that accomplish resources their students need.

DonorsChoose.org drives donations with Google Ad Grants

As the paramount platform for giving to public schools, DonorsChoose.org allows teachers across America to bring their classroom dreams to life by requesting much-needed materials and experiences for their students. Google Ads ad performance data provides the organization a lucid picture of teachers classroom needs and donor interest. And conversion tracking data allows DonorsChoose.org to make sure theyre using their Ad Grants account to the fullest. Through Ad Grants ads, the organization drove 7,000 teacher registrations and raised an additional $497,000 from about 5,000 donations in a year.

Raising money for Hope for Paws with YouTube Giving

Hope for Paws, a nonprofit animal rescue group, used YouTube Giving Fundraisers (beta) so that anyone could support them by clicking the Donate button on their videos. Through this feature, Hope for Paws was capable to raise over $260,000 in September and tell their story to a global audience.

Using mapping tools at the Geo for Good summit

In October, the Google Earth Outreach team hosted the Geo for Good Summit. At the summit, Googlers and nonprofit partners demonstrated how Google mapping toolslike Google Earth, Earth Engine, Google Maps Platform and 360 Street View Imagerycan help organizations raise awareness, whether its through mapping and monitoring threats to the planet or mapping indigenous culture.

Expanding reach with Google Maps Platform credits

Organizations like iNaturalist, Code.org and charity:water use the Google Maps Platform to help them reach their goalsfrom using Maps as a new way for donors to belief exactly where their dollars go, to helping people discover plant and animal life from around the world. In 2018, we expanded access for nonprofits to use these products in over 50 countries.

sciences

The Philippine Coral Reef at the California Academy of Sciences.

Collaborating with G Suite: Samasource and the California Academy of Sciences

This year, Samasource and the California Academy of Sciences presented at Cloud Next 18 about how they used G Suite to make a difference. Samasource, a nonprofit organization that aims to reduce global poverty by connecting unemployed people in impoverished countries to digital labor, connected its teams through G Suite for Nonprofits. By streamlining workflows across multiple locations, the Samasource team was capable to focus on their perfection of helping over 45,000 people out of poverty.

The California Academy of Sciences highlights biodiversity research and exploration, environmental education and sustainability across the globe. At no cost, G Suite for Nonprofits helped the Academy improve accessibility and collaboration across their team. Now, 650 staff members at the Academy can store, search and access shared content from anywhere.

Looking ahead to 2019

Let us know how Google for Nonprofits has made a difference for your nonprofit. In 2019, well be traveling around the world to film a video with five different nonprofits. If your organization has benefited from using Google products, share your story here and you could be one of them.





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